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Posts tagged “Hallock Hill

My Favorites of 2014

2014 has been a year when I’ve been relatively quiet on reviews, but I have been listening to many things, and I was very fortunate to attend some fabulous concerts that I’ve documented here with brief write-ups and photos (no photos of King Crimson!).  I’ve also been focused on other things, including making noise with some guitars.  As in the past, my listening is concentrated on what’s available to me, which is relatively narrow in scope, but I do listen to a pretty wide array of music.

This is my list of 14 favorites for 2014 (in no particular order) and then a few special categories.  Each title on the list links to the artist or record label website.  Happy Listening and I hope you all have a nice Holiday season, no matter what you celebrate.  Thank you for reading in 2014!

Albums

Sturgill

Sturgill Simpson – Metamodern Sounds in Country Music

 

n'monix cover

Nick Magnus – n’monix

Northlands

Tony Patterson & Brendan Eyre – Northwinds

Should WM 38

Should – The Great Pretend

Kosloff

Hallock Hill – Kosloff Mansion (My review was somewhat unconventional in interpretation–a really nice album).

Gareth Dickson

Gareth Dickson – Invisible String (a compilation of recent live recordings)

HGM

Hiss Golden Messenger – Lateness of Dancers

SH Royal Albert

Steve Hackett – Genesis Revisited: Live at the Royal Albert Hall 2CD/DVD (a fabulous live album & DVD with excellent sound quality!)

12k2031

Stephen Vitiello + Taylor Deupree – Captiva (double 10” LP)

MSMW

Medeski Scofield Martin Wood – Juice

Ben Watt

Ben Watt – Hendra

Beck

Beck – Morning Phase

Levin Bros

Levin Brothers – Levin Brothers (It’s only taken decades, but the Levin brothers got together and made a really marvelous jazz album)

Rosanne-Cash-The-River-The-Thread-300x300

Rosanne Cash – The River & The Thread

Soundtrack

Blizzard

Robin Guthrie and Harold Budd – White Bird in a Blizzard

Boxed Sets

ANTHONY PHILLIPS

Anthony Phillips – Harvest of the Heart (Anthology Boxed Set): Unlike the recent R-kive Genesis box set, Cherry Red knows how to put together a proper anthology, complete with many tracks of never-before heard music from AP’s archives.

Songs Ohia

Jason Molina – Songs: Ohia – Journey On (7” 45 RPM Compilation Box Set, a really beautiful set, probably rarer than hen’s teeth by now.)

KC Elements

King Crimson – The Elements (Tour Box, archive, live and some new material as a companion to the 2014 US Tour)

Reissues (Vinyl)

ERP

East River Pipe – The Gasoline Age (vinyl reissue, my introduction to the brilliant songs of F. M. Cornog when it was first released on CD in the early 1990s)

Lambcop XX

Lambchop – Live at XX Merge (I’m so happy that Merge Records decided to release this in honor of their 25th Anniversary.  Looks like the LP is out of print for the moment.)

EPs

William Tyler Lost Colony

William Tyler – Lost Colony

Olan Mill Half Seas Over

Olan Mill – Half Seas Over (Live performances 2012-2014)…too short for an album, too long for an EP, but what the heck!

An Accidental Concert Photo

SH


Hallock Hill – Kosloff Mansion

Kosloff Mansion

Hundred Acre Recordings HA06: 12” LP (copy 18/40 signed, 200 total LPs & digital download)

Label: http://www.hundredacrerecordings.com/ Arrangement and production by Tim Noble

http://www.hundredacrerecordings.com/artists/hallock-hill/hallock-hill-kosloff-mansion-2014/

Hallock Hill Website: http://hallockhill.com/

Tracks: Side A: 1) I Light The Lamp And Sit Down, 2) The Good Dead, 3) The People Without Tears, 4) Death Was A Bird, 5) Villages Of The Black Earth, 6) A Secret It Remains, 7) Another Light; Side B: 1) Workbench Atheist, 2) Demons In The Birchwood, 3) Farewell, Pale Corpse Of Many Sins, 4) The Immortalisation Commission, 5) We Looked For You For 52 Years, 6) Massed Bands And Megaphones

Ask a person cold about a particular moment in time and the recall on specifics might not be immediate or complete, but drop a needle on an LP or press play on a CD and the instant the music starts (even if it has been unheard for 30+ years) that same person’s recollection of a memory could be lucid, with the place, time and circumstances remembered in vivid detail.  Music is often a key that unlocks chambers in a memory palace.  While not necessarily as far back as 30 years, there are moments while listening to Kosloff Mansion that visions of the past coalesce and the aura of the album further enhances that experience.  Perhaps Tom Lecky had different intentions from my own experience for the inspiration of his fourth album, but that’s the power of music when combined with synapses, dendrites, proteins and whatever…

 

I often associate the works of HH’s with layered compositions for acoustic and electric guitar (as in the albums The Union or A Hem of Evening), but this LP is mostly rooted in solo piano with production and treatments by collaborator Tim Noble (of  The Lowland Hundred).  It’s hard to know where Noble’s contributions specifically appear, but I think of Lecky’s work as being mostly austere, without apparent structure at times, although intricately layered (some juxtapositions being left to chance).  I was fortunate to have ordered this LP early enough to obtain a copy signed by Lecky and Noble, along with a hand written short poem by TL.

Kosloff Mansion starts gently, like the rising Sun with beams of light reaching into the morning, or rather, a candle’s flame penetrating the darkness.  It could be an unhurried day or evening in a cabin in the woods, just sitting contemplating nothing (or everything) and listening without distraction—the types of moments of which we need more.  Briefly, a storm interrupts in The Good Dead and this triggers the vision of a very late night deep in the Adirondacks (of New York) with lightning and thunder that a (then) very young son wanted to end, but I wanted (privately) to continue, to hear the storm echoing through the mountains.  With assurances that the storm was increasingly distant, there was comfort enough for the younger to sleep and so the elder could continue listening and pondering that particular night before a loon emerged and greeted the dawn.

Instrumentation sometimes changes from solo piano to bells, or perhaps it’s a celeste, but they fit while shifting with the breezes, moonlight and stars reflecting in the lake of the vision.  A Secret It Remains blends liquid and tones before landing in the austerity of Another Light with only hints of ominous strings rolling in on an imaginary tide of a lurking then emerging spirit…before fading.

Workbench Atheist seems to be more of the morning; soft music with a light rain or is it the creaking of an ancient wood floor?  Demons In The Birchwood is a darker, but livelier spirit and the celeste returns with a deeper Leslie-esque treatment, before merging into a wraith-like Farewell, Pale Corpse Of Many Sins, which at times is unsettling yet ironically at peace.  A reverie is freed to peregrinate in The Immortalisation Commission and it builds to a crescendo and then gently disperses.  There is a firm perseverance in We Looked For You For 52 Years, a feeling of reverence is also present.   Massed Bands And Megaphones punctuates Kosloff Mansion with a blend of a celebratory whimsy and sounds reminiscent of fireworks echoing in the distance.

At times Kosloff Mansion is mysterious, yet halcyon moments come forth and while different in sound and instrumentation from his previous works, it’s very much rooted in what I have come to appreciate in Lecky’s work—a really brilliant and different kind of music experience.

****

Added bonus! Hallock Hill live on WFMU, along with Tim Noble (HH segment starts at about 30:00, but enjoy the entire show!): http://wfmu.org/playlists/shows/55533


Deep Winter Listening – Icebound Edition

I think I’m ready for Spring, but since that’s expecting too much at this point I’ll just stick to what’s spinning here lately…

WT

Tompkins Square Records Imaginational Anthem Volumes 1 to 5 (boxed with William Tyler’s Elvis Was A Capricorn, live performances) and Volume 6 (Tompkins Square TSQ 2790 and 2851):  I purchased this on intrigue after a few other TSQ label purchases and upon learning that Hallock Hill’s Tom Lecky had a piece on Volume 5.  It’s a wide-ranging collection of mostly acoustic guitar (American Primitive “fingerstyle”) works by some musicians well known (Max Ochs, John Fahey, James Blackshaw, Jack Rose, William Tyler, Daniel Bachman and Robbie Basho) and others more obscure.  The WT live CD is a bonus in the box, which is not sold separately—his wizardry is hypnotic.  Volume 6 has 14 historic recordings transferred from 78s.  It’s a really fascinating collection.

RR

Robert RichMorphology (Anodize AD 1304):  After really enjoying Rich’s last CD Nest, I thought I’d try this 2010 live recording (released in 2013).  At some sections it’s more rhythmic than Nest, but this again takes me back to the Modular Moog days of Tangerine Dream’s double live album Encore.  Turn down the lights, turn up the volume and take a ride.

LC N

LambchopNixon (MRG175):  This is a reissue of the 2000 release to help celebrate Merge Records’ 25th anniversary.  I opted for the CD, which includes a second CD White Session 1998 “How I Met Cat Power” recorded in 1998 (Lambchop “represented” by Kurt Wagner on vocals, tape loops and guitar recorded for Radio France).  Gone is the jewel box of the original and everything is contained in a double gate-fold sleeve with enhanced artwork.  This album was my introduction to Lambchop and the 5 track bonus CD (with 4 tracks from Nixon and The Saturday Option) is like having a private concert by Kurt in your living room.

78Proj

The 78 Project – Volume 1 (http://The78Project.com – 78P-001):  Somewhat like the Black Cab Sessions, this is the first of what looks like many forthcoming albums, most of the songs are traditional, recorded in one take on one blank lacquer disc on a 1930s vintage Presto direct-to-disc recorder working at 78 RPMs in full ruby-cut monaural with ambient noise and all.  Artists on this first volume include Richard Thompson, Loudon Wainwright III, Rosanne Cash and John Leventhal, Marshall Crenshaw and 9 others.  The LP is mastered for 33-1/3 RPM.  Old school and a fascinating concept.

PH

Porya HatamiShallow (Tench TCH 06): Recorded in Sanandaj Iran, Hatami’s latest album is a gorgeous instrumental work with three extended pieces (Fen, After The Rain and White Forest) of field recordings, loops and minimal instrumentation that are hypnotic, peaceful and produce a strong sense of place, and an escape.

TAD

The Autumn DefenseFifth (Yep Roc YEP-2354):  The core of the band is still Wilco’s Patrick Sansone and John Stirratt and this album for the most part picks up where their last album Once Around left off—well crafted songs with a relaxed but catchy vibe (some feel like they’re from the 60s and some could be from the 70s–make me think of Graham Gouldman’s work.)

HGM 1HGM 2

Hiss Golden MessengerPoor Moon and Bad Debt (Tompkins Square 2660 and Paradise of Bachelors PoB-11):  I got to HGM by poking around in TSQ’s back catalog and that led me to these two albums by the core of M. C. Taylor and Scott Hirsch (the latter being a reissue of Taylor penned and recorded songs which were a reaction to the 2008 financial crisis).  Stark at times, but I was immediately drawn into the genuine nature of the lyrics and roots-like instrumentation and arrangements.  Real solid albums and I’m looking forward to their 2013 album Haw when it arrives.

SRS

Steven R. SmithTableland (Emperor Jones EJ35CD website: http://www.worstward.com/):  Smith has a number of musical personas and in addition to music he is an instrument builder and print maker.  I’m most familiar with one of his aliases, Hala Strana (that work is more eastern European and traditionally-rooted).  Tableland is a (sadly, this 2001 CD is out of print, but download is available here: http://worstward.bandcamp.com/album/tableland) haunting and somewhat moody collection of largely electric guitar-based soundscapes that could easily be a soundtrack for a roadtrip to a long forgotten territory.

RC

Rosanne CashThe River & The Thread (Blue Note Records B00195t202):  Some musicians and artists with well-known predecessors often have periods of distancing themselves from those strong roots, breaking away to establish themselves.  Rosanne Cash (whose dad was Johnny Cash) and John Leventhal have produced a beautiful album of songs tracing RC’s memories and influences that have gradually resolved with time and understanding of the struggles of humble beginnings and the trials of fame.  The song Night School is stunning.  Get the CD version with the bonus tracks.

BLB

Ben Lukas Boysen – Gravity (Ad Noiseam ADN168CD):  The striking cover illustration drew me into the wake of this album and Boysen’s placid rhythms and harmonious aura suspended time.

HB AS

Harold BuddAvalon Sutra (Darla DRL 285):  This is a completely remastered (by sound engineer Bradford Ellis, who has worked with Budd for 30 years) reissue of the Samadhisound double CD that was first released in 2004 (often referred to as Harold Budd’s last album before he retired from composing and recording—lucky for us it was a false alarm!).  This double CD has new artwork and photographs, and the recordings have greater depth and clarity.

HB JM

Harold Budd & Jane MaruJane 1-11 (Darla DRL 287):  This is a two disc CD and DVD video release.  The CD is the same as DRL281, and the second disc includes video companions (by artist Jane Maru) to each of the tracks on the album.  Some of the videos are a very light touch with minimal effects and others explore colors, depth of field, transformation and the passage of time.  I wrote last year about this very special Harold Budd album.  Jane Maru did the cover artwork for this and the original CD release—she also does some really wonderful batiks.

 

Kraftwerk

And let’s not forget a favorite of mine – Kraftwerk!

I’m ready for the Spring Thaw!  Happy listening.