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Posts tagged “Merge Records

Hiss Golden Messenger – Lateness of Dancers

HGM Lateness of Dancers

Merge Records MRG 523 LP CD FLAC and MP3 Time: About 43 minutes

1) Lucia 2) Saturday’s Song 3) Mahogany Dread 4) Day O Day (A Love So Free) 5) Lateness of Dancers 6) I’m A Raven (Shake Children) 7) Black Dog Wind (Rose of Roses) 8) Southern Grammar 9) Chapter & Verse (Ione’s Song) 10) Drum

Artist Information http://www.mergerecords.com/hiss-golden-messenger Samples: http://www.mergerecords.com/songmgr/radio.php?album=60195&song=61865

Saturday’s Song:

I got to know Hiss Golden Messenger’s (M. C. Taylor) music after perusing the online catalog of Tompkins Square, where I had purchased William Tyler’s solo album Behold The Spirit (prior to his Merge Records release Impossible Truth).  I ordered the HGM album Poor Moon, and that was all it took for me to go off hunting for more, which led me to his 2013 album Haw (on Paradise of Bachelors) and ultimately to his first complete album Bad Debt, recorded in his kitchen shortly after the birth of his son in 2009.  There are overtones of concern in that album, since it was created as the global economic crisis was hitting financial markets and was having tangible effects on people.  It took Bad Debt a long time to see the light of day due to a warehouse fire during the London riots a few years back—most of the original CDs were lost.  Amanda Petrusich has a brief essay about Taylor at the Merge Records link above, and it will give further insight on the roots of his music and her impressions.

Lateness of Dancers is quieter and a bit slower in pace compared to Haw and the recording is more intimate, even introspective with some of the qualities of Bad Debt.  It includes some musicians from the previous albums along with primary collaborator Scott Hirsch (most often on electric and bass guitars) and William Tyler.  Taylor’s songs appear to be largely personal self-reflections, laments on vulnerability, restrained joy, explorations of faith and optimism.  This album sounds to me like it’s rooted in the early to mid-1970s in sound.

Taylor’s voice is at times like a melodic version of Bob Dylan as on Lucia, which has a gentle sway to it (as do other songs on the album).  I immediately felt like I was back in the early 1970s during Saturday’s Song (a time when I listened to albums for hours on end).  Saturday has a Jackson Browne Doctor My Eyes vibe to it and is instantly familiar and comfortable.  The spirit of Mick Fleetwood was present for the back beat of Mahogany Dread along with an early incarnation of Fleetwood Mac (for those of us old enough to remember!).  No doubt, Taylor’s son’s voice opens Day O Day (A Love So Free) with his self-assured proclamation (present in younger children) of the song’s title.  It’s quiet and contemplative and the subtitle gradually becomes an incantation of joy.  Lateness of Dancers is one of the more serious sounding tracks on the album, the other being Chapter & Verse (Ione’s Song), which is revealing and very contemplative.  I’m a Raven (Shake Children) growls with a heavy beat and is a contrast to the slow-dance quality of Black Dog Wind (Rose of Roses)Southern Grammar channels a gentler (yet still funky) version of Lowell George and Little Feat of the Dixie Chicken era (oh, how I miss Lowell George).

The album ends with a lightly orchestrated version of Drum (that first appeared on Bad Debt) and it has the spirit of a recessional, and it sounds hopeful “I’ll rise in the morning, take the good news and carry it away…”  Lateness of Dancers is good news indeed, and it seems like Hiss Golden Messenger has landed at a good spot with Merge, where his work will hopefully get to a wider audience, and they will let M. C. Taylor continue unencumbered to do what he does best: write thoughtful and beautifully crafted songs.


Spring At Last! What’s Spinning at Studio wajobu

Lest you all think that I only listen to Ambient and Progressive Rock music, I also listen to many other genres including Country music…wait, WAIT, don’t close the window–you won’t regret it!

Sturgill Simpson

Sturgill Simpson – Metamodern Sounds in Country Music (High Top Mountain):  This new album by SS is the real deal. Great country songs about real stuff with great music, and even better the first single released is Turtles All The Way Down (with a nod in the title to Stephen Hawking) and it’s deliciously psychedelic with reverb, phasing-shifting and Mellotron. Give it a listen:

Shearwater

Shearwater and Sharon Van Etten – Stop Draggin’ My Heart Around (SubPop):  From Record Store Day 2013, I missed this single, but I found it on RSD 2014 in the back of the singles bin—aha! The A side is by Tom Petty (which I can take or leave), but the gem is Jonathan Meiburg’s A Wake For The Minotaur—it’s just plain stunning. This live version features vocalist Jesca Hoop.

SongsOhia

Songs: Ohia – Journey On Collected Singles (Secretly Canadian):  Not much I can say about the tragic loss of Jason Molina that hasn’t already been written. Thank goodness we have Molina’s musical legacy, including his last band Magnolia Electric Company—great songs and music and many of subjects of Molina’s songs turned out to be prophetic. Long before he died, his last label Secretly Canadian was discussing releasing a boxed set of the early singles of Songs: Ohia, many of them quite rare and long out of print. Unfortunately Jason didn’t live to see it. It’s a beautiful blue cloth wrapped boxed set of nine 7” singles with a separate book of the original artwork and song histories and a CD compilation of all the singles. These were available on Record Store Day 2014 and they disappeared quickly…I was very fortunate to find a copy. Here’s a video on the set. If you can find one, buy it, you won’t regret it.

Mutual Benefit

Mutual Benefit – Love’s Crushing Diamond (Other Music Recording Co.):  Bob Boilen from NPR’s All Songs Considered got me to this album. Part folk, part psychedelic and reminds me a bit of a softer Grizzly Bear (the band) at times.

Hendra

Ben Watt – Hendra (Caroline – Unmade Road):  I’ve been a fan of Everything But The Girl (ETBG) since their early days and then Tracey Thorn and Ben Watt put that project on an indefinite hold while they pursued other musical endeavors and had a family. Tracey has released a number of excellent solo albums and this is Ben’s first solo album—very introspective. My favorite song is The Levels and David Gilmour plays slide guitar. This is a live version:

Lee Gobbi

Lee Gobbi – Purple Prose (www.leegobbi.com):  Lee is a fan of Progressive Rock music and the influences are clear on his self-produced debut album of mostly original songs with guest appearances by alums of the original 1970s and 80s Steve Hackett band. There are strong shades of The Beatles, ELO and the vibe of George Harrison’s work in this album. There are a couple of covers, a Stu Nunnery tune Madelaine (remember Stu Nunnery from the early 1970s?!) and a haunting version of Nick Drake’s Parasite. A brilliant first album, and I hear that there is a second album in the works—stay tuned. I’ll post some sound samples when they are available.

 

John Pizzarelli

John Pizzarelli – Double Exposure (Telarc):  This album from 2012 is of song interpretations and some pairings by Jazz guitarist (and son of Bucky Pizzarelli) and Popular song-man. The album is largely covers, with an original by Pizzarelli and his wife Jessica Molaskey Take A Lot Of Pictures (picking up where Michael Franks left off with his song Popsicle Toes). My favorite is the soulful Neil Young song Harvest Moon.

Elaine Radigue

Elaine Radigue – Trilogie de la Mort (Experimental Intermedia):  When I reviewing Nicholas Szczepanik’s latest album Not Knowing, I noticed the dedication to French composer and electronic music pioneer Elaine Radigue (born 1932) and I was reminded of this 3 CD trilogy that was composed as a tribute to her son upon his death. It’s very minimal with gradual layers in parts and intense at others. Like most of her other work it was composed on an Arp 2500 modular synthesizer. Since 2001 she has composed on and for primarily acoustic instruments.

Superchunk

Superchunk – I Hate Music (Merge Records):  This is the band that started Merge Records (http://www.mergerecords.com/i-hate-music) and if you have a chance read their book Our Noise – The Story of Merge Records. I heard FOH (stands for Front of House) just before the album was released and ordered it instantly (and then waited, since it was a preorder). Be careful, it’s raucous!

Tomotsugu Nakamura

Tomotsugu Nakamura – Soundium (Kaico):  I have Tench and Words On Music label’s Marc Ostermeier to thank for getting me to Nakamura’s work. He is a sound artist from Tokyo and Soundium is an album of microtones, springy and glitchy rhythms and fractional sound samples. The sounds and instrumentation are so pure—this is a great album and delightfully quirky at times.  http://naturebliss.bandcamp.com/album/soundium

 

Lateral reference: Soundium reminds me of the absolutely enchanting album In Light by 12k label’s Small Color (and I think that everyone should buy this album): http://www.12k.com/index.php/site/releases/in_light/

Federico Durand

Federico Durand – El estanque esmeralda (Spekk):  I find this album to be Durand’s most melodic work so far. Many of his previous albums and collaborations focus on longer form field recordings combined with bells, wind chimes and other instrumentation. This album concentrates on childhood memories of places and times, presented in delightfully concise pieces . The three latest Spekk label releases are in the larger format CD sleeves and they are a welcomed change from small digipacks, jewel boxes or (worse yet) plain sleeves. The music AND the art matters.  http://www.spekk.net/catalog/esmeralda.html

 

Celer Zigzag

Celer – Zigzag (Spekk):  Will Long AKA Celer is well known for his extensive ambient works and soundtracks. This is a more rhythmic (albeit subtle) electronic work. Have a listen:  http://www.spekk.net/artists/celer.html

 

Melodia Saudades

Melodia – Saudades (Kaico):  Melodia is a collaboration of Federico Durand and Tomoyoshi Date. I missed the original LP on the Own Records label, so I was quite pleased that Kaico released a CD version. More here: http://kaicojapan.tumblr.com/

Opitope Hau

Opitope – Hau (Spekk):  This is the first album by Tomoyoshi Date and Chihei Hatakeyama. Micro-tones, found sounds, ambient and field recordings along with instrumental (acoustic and electronic) improvisation make up Hau. The album is charmingly subtle at times and crystalline at others. The pieces are observations and explorations of places and experiences.  http://www.spekk.net/artists/opitope.html

Opitope Physis

Opitope – Physis (Spekk):  This is the latest CD from Opitope. The pieces are longer form than on Hau and curiously feel more like minimalist Jazz, at times. The instrumentation is more direct (recognizable), yet the environmental and visual influences are still present.

 

William Tyler Lost Colony

William Tyler – Lost Colony 12” 45 RPM EP (Merge Records):  Unlike Tyler’s recent (and fabulous) album Impossible Truth, which is a solo guitar album, this EP is a band release and Tyler reinterprets the track We Can’t Go Home, covers Michael Rother’s Karussel and the entirety of Side A is devoted to Whole New Dude. Dude is a ramble with a meandering opening (with excellent pedal steel by Luke Schneider) and then sets off on a driving rhythm (drums, guitar, pedal steel and bass) for the duration. It’s a traveling song, heading out “there” to explore, and Tyler lets it rip towards the end.  http://www.mergerecords.com/lost-colony

 

Orcas Yearling

Orcas – Yearling (Morr Music):  Orcas are Benoit Pioulard (another guise of Tom Meluch) and Rafael Anton Irisarri. This is the follow-up to their first eponymous collaboration in 2012. Yearling is part environmental instrumentals and part songs. The opening instrumental track Petrichor reminds me of Brian Eno’s The Spider and I from the 1977 album Before and After Science. I complained about the tone and mastering of BP’s most recent album, but this album sounds MUCH better. The songs are lush with vocals and harmonies by Pioulard—really nice music with oft-catchy refrains.

http://www.morrmusic.com/artist/Orcas/release/1705

 


Deep Winter Listening – Icebound Edition

I think I’m ready for Spring, but since that’s expecting too much at this point I’ll just stick to what’s spinning here lately…

WT

Tompkins Square Records - Imaginational Anthem Volumes 1 to 5 (boxed with William Tyler’s Elvis Was A Capricorn, live performances) and Volume 6 (Tompkins Square TSQ 2790 and 2851):  I purchased this on intrigue after a few other TSQ label purchases and upon learning that Hallock Hill’s Tom Lecky had a piece on Volume 5.  It’s a wide-ranging collection of mostly acoustic guitar (American Primitive “fingerstyle”) works by some musicians well known (Max Ochs, John Fahey, James Blackshaw, Jack Rose, William Tyler, Daniel Bachman and Robbie Basho) and others more obscure.  The WT live CD is a bonus in the box, which is not sold separately—his wizardry is hypnotic.  Volume 6 has 14 historic recordings transferred from 78s.  It’s a really fascinating collection.

RR

Robert RichMorphology (Anodize AD 1304):  After really enjoying Rich’s last CD Nest, I thought I’d try this 2010 live recording (released in 2013).  At some sections it’s more rhythmic than Nest, but this again takes me back to the Modular Moog days of Tangerine Dream’s double live album Encore.  Turn down the lights, turn up the volume and take a ride.

LC N

LambchopNixon (MRG175):  This is a reissue of the 2000 release to help celebrate Merge Records’ 25th anniversary.  I opted for the CD, which includes a second CD White Session 1998 “How I Met Cat Power” recorded in 1998 (Lambchop “represented” by Kurt Wagner on vocals, tape loops and guitar recorded for Radio France).  Gone is the jewel box of the original and everything is contained in a double gate-fold sleeve with enhanced artwork.  This album was my introduction to Lambchop and the 5 track bonus CD (with 4 tracks from Nixon and The Saturday Option) is like having a private concert by Kurt in your living room.

78Proj

The 78 Project – Volume 1 (http://The78Project.com – 78P-001):  Somewhat like the Black Cab Sessions, this is the first of what looks like many forthcoming albums, most of the songs are traditional, recorded in one take on one blank lacquer disc on a 1930s vintage Presto direct-to-disc recorder working at 78 RPMs in full ruby-cut monaural with ambient noise and all.  Artists on this first volume include Richard Thompson, Loudon Wainwright III, Rosanne Cash and John Leventhal, Marshall Crenshaw and 9 others.  The LP is mastered for 33-1/3 RPM.  Old school and a fascinating concept.

PH

Porya HatamiShallow (Tench TCH 06): Recorded in Sanandaj Iran, Hatami’s latest album is a gorgeous instrumental work with three extended pieces (Fen, After The Rain and White Forest) of field recordings, loops and minimal instrumentation that are hypnotic, peaceful and produce a strong sense of place, and an escape.

TAD

The Autumn DefenseFifth (Yep Roc YEP-2354):  The core of the band is still Wilco’s Patrick Sansone and John Stirratt and this album for the most part picks up where their last album Once Around left off—well crafted songs with a relaxed but catchy vibe (some feel like they’re from the 60s and some could be from the 70s–make me think of Graham Gouldman’s work.)

HGM 1HGM 2

Hiss Golden MessengerPoor Moon and Bad Debt (Tompkins Square 2660 and Paradise of Bachelors PoB-11):  I got to HGM by poking around in TSQ’s back catalog and that led me to these two albums by the core of M. C. Taylor and Scott Hirsch (the latter being a reissue of Taylor penned and recorded songs which were a reaction to the 2008 financial crisis).  Stark at times, but I was immediately drawn into the genuine nature of the lyrics and roots-like instrumentation and arrangements.  Real solid albums and I’m looking forward to their 2013 album Haw when it arrives.

SRS

Steven R. SmithTableland (Emperor Jones EJ35CD website: http://www.worstward.com/):  Smith has a number of musical personas and in addition to music he is an instrument builder and print maker.  I’m most familiar with one of his aliases, Hala Strana (that work is more eastern European and traditionally-rooted).  Tableland is a (sadly, this 2001 CD is out of print, but download is available here: http://worstward.bandcamp.com/album/tableland) haunting and somewhat moody collection of largely electric guitar-based soundscapes that could easily be a soundtrack for a roadtrip to a long forgotten territory.

RC

Rosanne CashThe River & The Thread (Blue Note Records B00195t202):  Some musicians and artists with well-known predecessors often have periods of distancing themselves from those strong roots, breaking away to establish themselves.  Rosanne Cash (whose dad was Johnny Cash) and John Leventhal have produced a beautiful album of songs tracing RC’s memories and influences that have gradually resolved with time and understanding of the struggles of humble beginnings and the trials of fame.  The song Night School is stunning.  Get the CD version with the bonus tracks.

BLB

Ben Lukas Boysen – Gravity (Ad Noiseam ADN168CD):  The striking cover illustration drew me into the wake of this album and Boysen’s placid rhythms and harmonious aura suspended time.

HB AS

Harold BuddAvalon Sutra (Darla DRL 285):  This is a completely remastered (by sound engineer Bradford Ellis, who has worked with Budd for 30 years) reissue of the Samadhisound double CD that was first released in 2004 (often referred to as Harold Budd’s last album before he retired from composing and recording—lucky for us it was a false alarm!).  This double CD has new artwork and photographs, and the recordings have greater depth and clarity.

HB JM

Harold Budd & Jane MaruJane 1-11 (Darla DRL 287):  This is a two disc CD and DVD video release.  The CD is the same as DRL281, and the second disc includes video companions (by artist Jane Maru) to each of the tracks on the album.  Some of the videos are a very light touch with minimal effects and others explore colors, depth of field, transformation and the passage of time.  I wrote last year about this very special Harold Budd album.  Jane Maru did the cover artwork for this and the original CD release—she also does some really wonderful batiks.

 

Kraftwerk

And let’s not forget a favorite of mine – Kraftwerk!

I’m ready for the Spring Thaw!  Happy listening.


Lucky 13 – My Favorites This Year…

…A Not-So Comprehensive List

IMG_0489

2013 has been a quirky year; for a time I found that inspiration had vanished and I wasn’t interested in listening to music or writing about it at all (a rare occurrence).  I’m guilty of having purchased less music this year (an economic curtailment of necessity).  Nonetheless, there has been some great music in 2013 (and my slice is a tiny piece of what’s out there).  This year I read some music-related memoirs by artists whose work I’ve admired for decades (Burt Bacharach, Neil Young, Michael Feinstein–of his time spent with Ira Gershwin and other books), some histories of Jazz Standards, Blues, Rock and Roll, and records labels (including one of my favorite indie labels, Merge Records).  I was also fortunate to attend a number of live shows, and I’ve posted photos of some of those throughout the year.

Is it me or have record labels and artists reduced their output somewhat?  Is it a lull in a normal cycle or a sign of the economic times?

Some of the music on this list will be familiar if you have checked-in to read my reviews and some I have not reviewed.  I also have some albums I’m still listening to and I haven’t decided if I’ll write reviews for them (an archival release by The Books, La Luz’s first LP, Mary Lattimore and others).  One album in particular that I’ve enjoyed recently (although it was NOT released this year) is a live archive solo recording of Neil Young at the Canterbury House in 1968 entitled Sugar Mountain—the album is mostly material that Young wrote or co-wrote with Buffalo-Springfield, and it was recorded right after Buffalo-Springfield broke-up.

NY SM

A double live CD has also just arrived of one of the last (very lively hot Jazz) gigs played by the house band at Eddie Condon’s in New York City before it closed in 1985—One Night at Eddie Condon’s (Red “The Commodore” Balaban’s Condon Band), with Ed Polcer, Dr Palu Squire, Jack Maheu, Tom Artin, Bobby Pratt, Dave Shapiro and Danny D’Imperio, recorded by Doug Pomeroy)–thanks to Tom Artin for sending this great piece of Jazz history!

****

The Lucky 13 (all albums purchased–not promos)

Yellowbirds SFTVF

Yellowbirds – Songs From The Vanished Frontier – Royal Potato Family:  This is my favorite album of the year—just love it–the vibe, the sounds.  Please see my June review.

HB Jane1-11

Harold Budd – Jane 1-11 – Darla:  The music with companion videos release won’t be available until early 2014, but another beautiful album from HB.  I reviewed this album in June, as well.

JSUD

John Scofield – Überjam Deux – Emarcy:  I reviewed this album in August—an excellent follow-up to the original Überjam, and a great vibe with Jazz, Blues and more!

Steve Hackett Hammersmith Digi w info.indd

Steve Hackett Genesis Revisited: Live At Hammersmith (CD/DVD) – InsideOut:  As I noted in my review of last year’s studio release of Genesis Revisited II, I feel like Steve Hackett is the keeper of the spirit of the work of Genesis during the 1971 to 1977 era.  So many of the earlier recordings (weak on the engineering and mix, except The Lamb) were greatly improved and enhanced, and this comprehensive 3 CD and 2 DVD set documents the fabulous and memorable Hammersmith show in May of 2013 before the band traveled to the US for their fall tour.  The SH Band will tour further in support of this in the southeastern US and Europe and Russia is 2014 (bassist Lee Pomeroy will be replaced by Nick Beggs, a familiar face to Hackett Band fans…I really enjoyed Lee on this tour, he really brought out just how musical Mike Rutherford’s bass lines are in these earlier Genesis classics).

Wire CBU

Wire – Change Becomes Us – Pink Flag:  I was a big fan of Wire in the late 1970s and then I just plain lost touch with their work.  The Words On Music label has a compilation of reinterpretations of their well-known single Outdoor Miner from their 1978 Chairs Missing album, and then I noticed a post earlier in the year by Marc Ostermeier (of the band Should ,and WOM and Tench labels) that a new album was forthcoming.

Juliette

Juliette Commagere – Human – Aeronaut:  Late in 2010 Commagere released her album The Procession on Manimal Records—a diverse combination of songs with dense and gorgeous vocals instrumentation—part art-rock, progressive and electronica.  Commagere has returned with another beautifully recorded album of lush songs with her strong vocals and support from husband Joachim Cooder, Ben Messelbeck, Amir Yaghmai, Ry Cooder and recorded by Mark Rains and Martin Pradler.  The sound is deep, full, inventive and often fantastical—she is doing her own thing, and I love it (catchy melodies and all).  There are times when she channels Elizabeth Fraser as on Low.

TS Cover

Roger Eno – Ted Sheldrake – Backwater:  Thirty Years after his first work Apollo with brother Brian and guitarist Dan Lanois, Roger Eno compiled this tribute to friend and neighbor, Ted Sheldrake.  Although I reviewed this album in November of 2012, it wasn’t officially released until January of this year.

C&S Secret Angles 500x500

Cock & Swan – Secret Angles – HushHush:  I am eagerly awaiting my blue vinyl (Kickstarter-funded) copy of this digital release that I reviewed in August.

Ferry Jazz

The Bryan Ferry Orchestra – The Jazz Age – BMG:  Back in March I did a brief comparative analysis of this album and Steven Wilson’s latest (see below).  I think this is a really spirited and fun reinterpretation of earlier works by Roxy Music and BF.  Being a lover of old acoustically recorded 78s of the pre-Jazz and Jazz ages, I get this.

Wilson Raven

Steven Wilson – The Raven That Refused To Sing (and Other Stories) – kscope:  A strong album (I think it’s Steve’s best to date), beautifully recorded and engineered by Alan Parsons.  My favorite song is Drive Home.

William Tyler - Impossible Truth

William Tyler – Impossible Truth – Merge:  A brilliant solo guitar album by Lambchop and Hands Off Cuba alum, and a great follow-up to his previous Tompkins Square release Behold The Spirit.  I reviewed this album in March.

celer murmur

Celer – Viewpoint – Murmur:  As I noted when I reviewed this album in April, I find this album absorbing and romantic—a great piece for getting lost.

RS 4EVRNDVR

Ron Sexsmith – Forever Endeavour – Cooking Vinyl:  I love Ron’s work–started listening in 1997 with his third album Other Songs.  Forever Endeavour is sparsely arranged, but strings, horn, percussion, pedal steel or electric bass are right there when they’re needed.  Other than that, the songs are Ron’s voice, and his acoustic guitar.  He has a gift for wordplay and expressing emotions with a deft efficiency that flow so naturally with his melodies.  Some songs on Forever Endeavour are ironically upbeat, like Nowhere Is and Snake Road—in a sense, keeping the faith.  The CD has two bonus tracks (songs written with Don Black and recorded by Don Kerr), Life After A Broken Heart and Autumn Light, and they are just plain gorgeous additions to this album.  Here’s a live recording of Autumn Light.

****

Two of my favorite new discoveries in 2013

MB D

Meridian Brothers – Desesperanza – Soundway:  I heard about Meridian Brothers in an NPR Alt Latino podcast and was instantly hooked by this band from Bogata, Colombia–buying as much of their back catalog as I could find in physical releases.  Their music is surreal and playful—a combination of Joe Meek, Esquivel and Raymond Scott.

La Luz Brainwash (7″) – Suicide Squeeze: This is a single (my version is on clear vinyl) that was released by La Luz just prior to their new album It’s Alive—It’s infectious and fun!  I got to La Luz thanks to Johnny Goss (one half of Cock & Swan).


Review: William Tyler – Impossible Truth

William Tyler - Impossible Truth

Merge Records CD MRG465 – Time: About 54 minutes

http://www.mergerecords.com/artists/tyler%20william and http://www.sebastianspeaks.com/

Tracks: 1) Country Illusion, 2) The Geography Of Nowhere, 3) Cadillac Desert, 4) We Can’t Go Home Again, 5) A Portrait Of Sarah, 6) Hotel Catatonia, 7) The Last Residents Of Westfall, 8) The World Set Free

I posit that William Tyler is a thinker, and is perhaps more comfortable expressing himself with music than with words (although his spoken thoughts on the Merge teaser video have a distinct and interesting clarity).  Tyler has worked in a number of bands prior to his solo albums including the Silver Jews, the ongoing experimental collective Hands Off Cuba and Lambchop (in addition to his record label, Sebastian Speaks).  Tyler’s work brings a wide range of colors and moods to Lambchop’s sound, where he has been a principal guitarist for many years.  Impossible Truth seems to me to be a more cohesive and mature work than his last solo album on the Tompkins Square label, Behold The Spirit.  Nonetheless, I urge readers to seek out this very strong album.

Behold The Spirit - WilliamTyler

The titles of the tracks on this album are like the names of short stories, and from the moment the cord is pulled on the first note of a track we are thrust right into the middle of the scene, without shyness or any lack of confidence.  It almost feels like Tyler propels a well-worn yet vibrant flywheel at the start of each piece, and from that moment he is shaping and sculpting the sound and mood until the story is told.

 

Country Of Illusion starts mysteriously and sounding rather exotic (as if from a foreign land, sitar-like).  There are sweeping passages envisioning a changing scene and then there are pauses (almost like a moment of contemplation) before moving through a sonic curtain and then the next passage of the tale.  Some tracks show a greater tenderness (with solo acoustic guitar) than others like We Can’t Go Home Again or A Portrait Of Sarah (although musically the latter is quite adventurous, as are many relationships).  The Geography Of Nowhere has a resonant otherness of being on the edge of consciousness and sensing the tangible without being able to actually reach it.  There are others like Cadillac Desert and Hotel Catatonia that present vistas as broad and intense as a Montana sky (and I never knew what a big sky looked like until I saw one).  The fretwork, picking and phrasing are tracing the landscapes and wrapping the listener in the gentle or gusty breezes of sound.

The Last Residents Of Westfall sounds like a scene from a dying or deserted town as the music pans to each of the buildings in the village, all with their own story to tell, some jaunty and others subdued.  The closing track of the album, The World Set Free is the most reflective, but it enlivens joyfully as the track progresses—the acoustic bass being a steady and forthright heartbeat, and finally William Tyler releases to a growling close.  I am trying to resist comparisons, but the opening section is similar to the instrumental sections of Nick Drake’s Bryter Layter.

 

Tyler disguises his guitars as many different instruments, and his musicianship and intense fingerings give a sense that more than one set of hands is at work, yet there is never a sense of Tyler playing a guitar hero—my guess is that he sees himself as quite the opposite.  Just like Lambchop, William Tyler blurs the distinction of musical genres; first this is an instrumental acoustic and electric guitar album, there are hints of twang, country and roots in it, but also some blues, folk and rock and roll.  Merge Records has a wide ranging catalog of musicians and has been around for more than two decades.  I just finished reading and thoroughly enjoyed their biography of the first twenty years of Merge, Our Noise.  Even though William Tyler has been part of the Merge family for many years in his work with Lambchop, I’m thrilled that he has released this latest brilliant solo album with Merge.  This is an album that I highly recommend.

Merge Records just posted this reinterpretation (homage?) to the film Two Lane Blacktop with A Portrait of Sarah as the soundtrack.

 


A List Too Small – My Favorites of 2012

Thank you to all the artists and record labels for such wonderful and diverse music.

This is one list of many, it’s my list, and it leaves off many other favorites that I have enjoyed over the year in addition to the thousands of other albums and single tracks that make up music throughout the World.  What has helped me arrive at this list is what I have always loved about music: Does it move me?  In addition, is it creative, well recorded and produced with a degree of care that makes me pay attention to it?  There was a time when I was obsessed with highly produced and tightly engineered works, then I learned about artists such as East River Pipe and Sparklehorse, and many other genres of music were opened to me.

If you don’t see your favorite album on this list (or even your own album), it doesn’t mean a thing.  If an album has been reviewed on my website this year, it’s meaningful to many others and me, but this is only a very, very small slice of the music world.  Often people ask me about new music, and what I recommend.  When I started this website in late January, 2012 it was first a means to write about music that I enjoyed, but also to get to know other artists and learn about new music that they create, so I could pass it on.  Often, the best new music is that referred by a friend.  Please feel free to send me your comments and recommendations.

Special note: There are still three or four late 2012 releases that are either enroute to me, have yet to be released or have just arrived.  I need to spend proper time listening to and absorbing these albums.  Rather than delaying this list further, and if after listening to those last 2012 releases I feel that they hit a sweet spot, I’ll review those albums in early 2013.  I know of at least two 2012 releases that I’ll likely not receive until 2013.

I have three categories: Albums (12), Individual Tracks (6), and Special Releases (3) that don’t necessarily fit into a category.

Albums (Artist – Album Title – Record Label)

T&Y TLOF

1) Twigs & Yarn – The Language of Flowers – Flau

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2) Lambchop – Mr. M – Merge Records

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3) Zammuto – Zammuto – Temporary Residence

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4) Steve Hackett – Genesis Revisited II – Inside Out Music

12k-faint-cover

5) Taylor Deupree – Faint – 12k

BillowObservatory

6) Billow Observatory – Billow Observatory – Felte

12k10701Gareth

7) Gareth Dickson – Quite A Way Away – 12k

Pill-Oh KL

8) Pill-Oh – Vanishing Mirror – Kitchen. Label

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9) Brambles – Charcoal – Serein

almost-charlie-ty

10) Almost Charlie – Tomorrow’s Yesterday – Words On Music

CodyChesnuTT

11) Cody ChesnuTT – Landing On A Hundred – One Little Indian

SM DEEP

12) Stick Men – Deep – Stick Men Records

Individual Tracks (from other albums)

 

1) Library Tapes – Sun peeking through (from the album Sun peeking through) – Self Released

2) Cock & Swan – Orange & Pink (from the album Stash) – Lost Tribe Sound

3) Alex Tiuniaev – Daylight (from the album Blurred) – Heat Death Records

4) Kyle Bobby Dunn – In Praise of Tears (from the album In Miserum Stercus) – Komino

5) Kane Ikin & David Wenngren – Chalk (from the album Strangers) – Keshhhhhh

6) Olan Mill – Bleu Polar (from the album Paths) – Fac-ture

Special Releases

Celer Machinefabriek

1) Celer & Machinefabriek: Maastunnel/Mt. Mitake, Numa/Penarie, Hei/Sou – Self Released

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Darren%20McClure%20artworkThe%20Green%20Kingdom%20artwork

 

 

 

 

 

2) Birds Of A Feather: Michael Frommer – The Great Northern Loon, Porya Hatami – The Black Woodpecker, Darren McClure – The Black Kite, The Green Kingdom – The Great Blue Heron – Flaming Pines

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3) Simon Scott, Corey Fuller, Marcus Fischer, Tomoyoshi Date and Taylor Deupree (Recorded live in Japan October, 8, 2012) – Between (…The Branches) – 12k

Record Labels Noted Above

Flau: http://www.flau.jp/

Merge Records: http://www.mergerecords.com/

Temporary Residence LTD: http://temporaryresidence.com/

Inside Out: http://www.insideoutmusic.com/

12k: http://12k.com/

Felte: http://www.feltesounds.com/

Kitchen. Label: http://www.kitchen-label.com/

Serein: http://www.serein.co.uk/

Words On Music: http://www.words-on-music.com/

One Little Indian: http://indian.co.uk/shop/landing-on-a-hundred-1.html

Stick Men Records: http://stick-men.net

Library Tapes: http://librarytapes.com/

Lost Tribe Sound: http://www.cockandswan.com/ Note: I have not listed the weblink to the record label as Google has noted that the website MAY be compromised.

Heat Death Records: http://www.heatdeathrecords.co.uk/

Komino: http://kominorecords.com/

Kesh (Simon Scott’s label): http://www.keshhhhhh.com/

Facture: http://www.fac-ture.co.uk/

Machinefabriek & Celer: http://machinefabriek.bandcamp.com/ & http://www.thesingularwe.org/fs/

Flaming Pines: http://flamingpines.com/


Lambchop – One Of My Favorite Concerts of 2012

My photo of Kurt Wagner of the band Lambchop taken at La Poisson Rouge in NYC on April 19, 2012.  This photo was used in Spin Magazine’s Concert blog.  It was a concert of inexplicable beauty and musicianship–very memorable.  An even more memorable night, because I had a chance to meet F. M. Cornog (aka East River Pipe) and his lovely wife, Barbara Powers.  Photo Copyright by wajobu (please use only with permission and credit—thank you).

I have many other photos from that concert if anyone is interested in seeing them.

So many great songs that night, but My Blue Wave was right up there…


What’s Spinning At Work Today? **UPDATE**

Cortney Tidwell’s – Boys:  A really interesting (and at times experimental) exploration of songwriting and sound.  This and her previous albums, one self-titled from 2005 and “Don’t Let The Stars Keep Us Tangled Up” from 2006 (with Kurt Wagner and William Tyler of Lambchop) have also resulted in some inventive remixes (by Hands Off Cuba) and videos.  Available from: http://www.cityslang.com/

Savvas Ysatis + Taylor Deupree’s – The Sleeping Morning:  A four track EP resulting from a 2007 collaboration.  Electro-acoustic, peaceful and recorded directly to multi-track with minimal editing.  The CD might still be available at some distributors, but a download is at: http://www.12k.com/ Try also…looks like the CD is still here: http://darla.com/

Lambchop’s – Damaged: Another in the canon of  calming beautiful works with delightful wordplay as in the opening track “Paperback Bible”.  Available at: http://www.mergerecords.com/

Gareth Dickson’s – Collected Recordings: After listening to Gareth’s latest album “Quite A Way Away” on the http://www.12k.com/ label, I hunted around for his previous work and found this, a collection of recordings from the previous five years on the http://driftingfalling.com/ label.

KORT’s – Invariable Heartache: This is actually the album that got me familiar with Cortney Tidwell’s solo work.  A great album of re-recorded songs that were once on the Chart record label (run by Cortney Tidwell’s grandfather, Slim Williamson).  Kurt Wagner of Lambchop is the collaborator, so Cort + Kurt = KORT.  You can get this album here: http://www.mergerecords.com/store/store_detail.php?catalog_id=846

*****************

Afternoon Postscript:  OK, I was slow and missed the chance to get the original issues on CD and vinyl, so I settled for a 12k/iTunes download and burned CDs, so this is what’s on this afternoon:

Marcus Fischer – Monocoastal: I’m just listening for the first time as I type this.  A combination of field recordings, found sounds, harmonics and textures woven and inspired by Fischer’s wanderings up and down the west coast for 20 years.  This is Marcus Fischer’s website: http://unrecnow.com/dust/about

Taylor Deupree + Marcus Fischer – In A Place Of Such Graceful Shapes: This was originally issued as a small box with a CD and clear vinyl 7″.  It really looked beautiful and am sorry to have missed out on it.  More electro-acoustic heaven.  More about this album and both artists here: http://www.12k.com/index.php/site/releases/in_a_place_of_such_graceful_shapes

A video excerpt is here:

 


East River Pipe – We Live In Rented Rooms

Merge Records – mrg342 – CD – Released 2011 – http://www.mergerecords.com/artists/eastrp

Track Listing: 1) Backroom Deals; 2) Cold Ground; 3) Payback Time; 4) Summer Boy; 5) I Don’t Care About Your Blue Wings; 6) Tommy Made a Movie; 7) The Flames Are Coming Back; 8) When You Were Doing Cocaine; 9) Conman; 10) Three Ships

I don’t recall the publication, but I certainly remember the moment and it marked a turning point for me—I was ready for something different, musically.  Much of the music I had been listening to, at the time, was from larger commercial record labels with corporate directors and production teams, where artists rarely could steer their music in a direction of their own making.  As much as I admire well-produced, engineered and recorded works of all sorts, the review I was reading in the late 1990s intrigued me enough to find a copy of East River Pipe’s “The Gasoline Age”.

East River Pipe is F.M. Cornog (aka, Fred) and his early adult years were apparently rather dark and mired with substance abuse and a brief encounter with homelessness.  Eventually, with the assistance of a woman named Barbara Powers, F.M. recovered and she helped him acquire recording equipment to write songs.  Years later, F.M. would marry Ms. Powers. 

F.M. does not play live, or tour and he records alone, initially in his bedroom and now in a compact home-studio.  He has a small and devoted fan base.  His equipment is mostly low-tech (at first a 4 track portable) and though he has updated to digital recording his set-up remains simple.  He writes his own material, plays the instruments, sings, produces, records and determines the direction of his own artistic expression.  As far as I have read, his label Merge Records lets him do what he wants with his work and material is released on no particular schedule except when F.M. says the work is ready.  I admit that for some, his music will be an acquired taste, but he writes on subjects that often cut right to the bone with reality.  Artists such as Lambchop, David Byrne, The Mountain Goats and Okkervil River have covered his songs.

F.M. tells stories; some are stark, tragic and perhaps echo aspects of his own past.  He also captures a mood and its color with a remarkable depth that belies the simplicity of a given song.  Many of his songs are short, some seem like hooks or choruses without verses like “Wholesale Lies” from “The Gasoline Age”.  In many ways, Fred writes with a clarity and sharpness as Ernest Hemingway wrote.  What one hears in the words, melodies and instrumentation is all that’s needed to express the thought, nothing else.

 

After “The Gasoline Age”, I purchased his earlier works “Mel”, “Poor Fricky” and the compilation of his early cassette tape releases “Shining Hours in a Can”.  Then to his subsequent releases “Garbageheads on Endless Stun” and the rather dark “What Are You On?”  Cornog songs can be sardonic and even political and often (I think) there’s irony in the upbeat tone of the music as a sharp contrast to the dark subjects of the lyrics like with the opening track of “Where Does All The Money Go?” on “Garbageheads…”

 

Married and now with a young daughter and a day-job at Home Depot, Cornog’s releases are less frequent (5 years since his last), but his songs are still keen yet with slightly more atmospheric arrangements.  The songs on “We Live In Rented Rooms” observe human conditions, provide social commentary, defend the defenseless and for some dream about what is likely unattainable.  Some might think the subjects are a downer, but in many of the songs there are glimmers of hope in a verse, a chorus or a catchy melody.  They are the kind of songs that can make one stop and think about one’s own situation.

 

I suppose that one might have to be in a certain frame of mind for listening to this album.  “Backroom Deals” opens the album is a piece about the annoying realities of making it through a workday for many.  Despite the melancholy of the languid almost defeated rhythm of the piece it’s punctuated deftly with guitar and electric piano to make it to quitting-time.  “Summer Boy” is possibly the reality of a local who watches the comings and goings of tourists and at the end of the season, being the one who is forgotten.  “The Flames Are Coming Back” is of one who is trying to turn a life around and the struggle to keep things together for a family.  “When You Were Doing Cocaine” gets right to it with the shock of a corrupted life affecting others and the piece is sewn together with an almost lullaby of a melody and the dreamy irony of a chorus that beckons for a better place.

In the music business today, many artists demand to be seen and heard, but F.M. Cornog as East River Pipe, true to himself, quietly sings of those who exist below the din of a world flashing by.

This review appeared in the January 2012 Issue of Affordable Audio: http://www.affordableaudio.org/Affordable$$Audio/Current_Issue.html


Lambchop – Mr. M – UPDATED

Merge Records – MRG 434 (CD & LP Versions)

More information and available at: http://www.mergerecords.com/artists/lambchop

CD: Tracks 1) If not I’ll just die, 2) 2B2, 3) Gone tomorrow, 4) Mr. Met, 5) Gar, 6) Nice without mercy, 7) Buttons, 8) The good life (is wasted), 9) Kind of, 10) Betty’s Overture, 11) Never my love

Note: Double LP version has 3 sides with the 11 tracks of the CD and a 4th side with 4 additional tracks, “Guess I’m dumb” and three remixes of selected tracks noted above.

Album is dedicated to: James Victor Chesnutt

Kurt Wagner is a humble and interesting character (and from what I have read) a former flooring contractor, now artist, painter, musician, songwriter…and…human, with all the flaws, working through life in his marvelous songwriting.

I came to Lambchop’s work relatively late (through a lateral association with Vic Chesnutt, Mark Linkous and F. M. Cornog’s works) about 5 years ago when I first heard “The Daily Growl” from the 2002 album “Is a Woman”.  I was immediately rapt with the music, instrumentation and the stream-of-consciousness lyrics (coming from a man who sounds like a reluctant singer).  In that song alone, I felt and heard a deep inner beauty and from there I immediately acquired as many of Lambchop’s recordings I could get my hands on, back to their first in 1994 “I Hope You’re Sitting Down/Jack’s Tulips”.  At times, Wagner’s song lyrics seem to have little relation to the apparent subject matter of a given song, or they form the basis for the emotion being expressed (with distracted interjections), and at times the lyrics form a connective thread for the music (like the song “Paperback Bible” from the 2006 album “Damaged”, which I have read is a transcript from a local Nashville radio station broadcast set to music).

Lambchop’s music is neither country nor folk, nor is it rock or alternative.  It’s rather indescribable, yet it is often introspective and has a strong sense of a given moment, emotion or place.  “Mr. M” is the eleventh studio album by Lambchop (a collective of musicians centered on Kurt Wagner).  The band is a core of familiar players: Scott Martin (drums), Matt Swanson (bass), Ryan Norris (guitar and organ), William Tyler (guitar) with guests (original co-founder) Jonathan Marx (credited with “noises”), Cortney Tidwell (vocals and collaborator on their KORT project) and others (see link to Merge Records above).

Gone Tomorrow (official video):

2B2 (official video):

Apparently, for a time Wagner considered not recording again until he was convinced by friends (including producer Mark Nevers) to go back into the studio.  Wagner was painting and doing other things prior to writing the songs and working on the recording (the album was recorded from 2009 to 2011).  Wagner’s paintings form the basis for the album’s artwork, from a series of black and white (heavy brush stroke) paintings entitled “Beautillion Militaire 2000”.  “Mr. M”, while another in the canon of rather quiet and contemplative works by Lambchop, is an appropriate and loving tribute to Vic Chesnutt.

In this work the lyrics vary from literal heartbreak to ironic wordplay and at times are layered with references to song arrangements having an effect (in real time) on Wagner, random thoughts, daily routines and things as mundane (yet real) as a coffee maker or trash on the motorway.  The instrumental “Gar” is a gorgeous and timeless interlude at the heart of the album, beautifully arranged with strings, woodwinds and Cortney Tidwell’s harmonic layered vocals.  “The Good Life” is reminiscent of Johnny Cash’s works of self-examination.  In some ways this album has a similar spirit of introspection and sound to Nick Drake’s “Bryter Layter”—another album of observations, hope, dreams and deep reflections.  Some may say that “Mr. M” is rather sleepy, but I think it’s a soul-cleansing meditation with many layers of symbolism to be discovered and understood as one listens more.  The strings and woodwinds arrangements are just right (similar to Robert Kirby’s on Drake’s “Bryter Layter”).

I am thankful that Kurt Wagner and Lambchop decided to make music again.


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